What the Frack?

I was doing some research recently for an article in ONG (Oil & Natural Gas) sector practice that is making huge headlines recently called “fracking”.

For those who ask What the Frack?

Fracking, or Frack, (or hydraulic fracturing – oh my, how much we love shortening things into cute names) is a procedure in which essentially you are fracturing (or cracking) things with hydraulics hoping to find oil or gas. Essentially this gives us an opportunity to do horizontal drilling which was otherwise impossible.

Conventional places are running dry so we need to find new sources – oil out of sand, gas out of rocks. We are becoming God by performing these miracles!

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How to effectively build a hybrid SaaS API management strategy

– By Andy Thurai (@AndyThurai) and Blake Dournaee (@Dournaee). This article was originally published on Gigaom

Summary: Enterprises seeking agility are turning to the cloud while those concerned about security are holding tight to their legacy, on-premise hardware. But what if there’s a middle ground?

If you’re trying to combine both a legacy and a cloud deployment strategy without having to do everything twice a hybrid strategy might offer the best of both worlds. We discussed that in our first post API Management – Anyway you want it!.

In that post, we discussed the different API deployment models as well as the need to understand the components of API management, your target audience and your overall corporate IT strategy. There was a tremendous readership and positive comments on the article. (Thanks for that!). But, there seem to be a little confusion about one particular deployment model we discussed – the Hybrid (SaaS) model. We heard from a number of people asking for more clarity on this model. So here it is.

Meet Hybrid SaaS

A good definition of Hybrid SaaS would be “Deploy the software, as a SaaS service and/or as on-premises solution, make those instances co-exist, securely communicate between each other, and be a seamless extension of each other.”

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API Management – Anyway you want it!

– By Andy Thurai (Twitter:@AndyThurai) and Blake Dournaee (@Dournaee). This article originally appeared on Gigaom.

Enterprises are building an API First strategy to keep up with their customer needs, and provide resources and services that go beyond the confines of enterprise. With this shift to using APIs as an extension of their enterprise IT, the key challenge still remains choosing the right deployment model.

Even with bullet-proof technology from a leading provider, your results could be disastrous if you start off with a wrong deployment model. Consider developer scale, innovation, incurring costs, complexity of API platform management, etc. On the other hand, forcing internal developers to hop out to the cloud to get API metadata when your internal API program is just starting is an exercise leading to inefficiency and inconsistencies.

Components of APIs

But before we get to deployment models, you need to understand the components of API management, your target audience and your overall corporate IT strategy. These certainly will influence your decisions.

Not all Enterprises embark on an API program for the same reasons – enterprise mobility programs, rationalizing existing systems as APIs, or find new revenue models, to name a few.  All of these factors influence your decisions.

API management has two major components: the API traffic and the API metadata. The API traffic is the actual data flow and the metadata contains the information needed to certify, protect and understand that data flow. The metadata describes the details about the collection of APIs. It consists of information such as interface details, constructs, security, documentation, code samples, error behavior, design patterns, compliance requirements, and the contract (usage limits, terms of service). This is the rough equivalent of the registry and repository from the days of service-oriented architecture, but it contains a lot more. It differs in a key way; it’s usable and human readable. Some vendors call this the API portal or API catalog.

Next you have developer segmentation, which falls into three categories – internal, partner, and public. The last category describes a zero-trust model where anyone could potentially be a developer, whereas the other two categories have varying degrees of trust. In general, internal developers are more trusted than partners or public, but this is not a hard and fast rule.

Armed with this knowledge, let’s explore popular API Management deployment models, in no particular order.

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